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Welcome to Yewdale Primary School

Blyton Class (Yr 1)

Blyton Class

Welcome to Blyton Class!

 

Mrs Roberts

Supported by Ms Burns and Miss Hartley

 

Welcome to Year One!

Welcome to Blyton Class and another busy term.  Important information about our class routines, PE timetables and our expectations for reading and learning at home can be found below. 

 

Learning Goals

Check out the maths, writing and reading learning goals that children in Year One are working hard to secure this half term.  Each goal is progressive, and as your child secures one step they will move onto the next to ensure they are always moving forward with their learning.  In maths, we are learning to divide numbers by 2, 5 and 10 using mental strategies, concrete objects, pictures and arrays.   In writing, we are learning to improve our writing by re-reading what we have written to check it makes sense, spot errors, and to know how to make it better.  In reading, we are developing our comprehension skills to ensure we understand the books we read by checking that the text makes sense and correcting errors.

Curriculum

At Yewdale, we offer a rich, broad and balanced curriculum.  Please find below an overview of our current geography based topic ‘Follow that Map!' In this topic, children will understand that maps are aerial persepctives of the things we see on the ground as we move from A to B.  They will begin to explore the features of maps, and know that human features, natural features and places of interest are represented on maps using symbols and pictures.  They will use compass points to solve problems and have a go at mapping our school and local area.  Our curriculum overview shows all of the learning skills children in Year One will be developing in each subject this half term. 

Blyton News - Read All About It!

Want to know what we get up to in Year One? Then check out our latest news stories and learning activities below.

Summer 2  - Geography Topic

Follow that Map!

Launching our topic!

Children arrived in class to find a mysterious parcel waiting for them.  Inside we found a map of our playground, a set of cryptic clues and a letter from the world-famous Explorers Club.  The letter challenged us to solve a puzzle and uncover the hiding place of some top secret information  which had been hidden somewhere in our school grounds.   We decided to accept the challenge!  We followed the clues and eventually discovered the hidden treasure - buried in our playground sandpit.   

Letter from Sir O S Map

Our cryptic clues...

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Exploring Famous Explorers
Once recruited into the Explorers Club, children were given access to some Top Secret files about famous land, air, sea and space adventurers from the past and present.  Do you recognise these explorers?  What do you know about their amazing adventures?

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Mapping our playground

The Explorers Club set us a challenge: to draw a map of our school playground. We were given a blank sheet of paper, a clipboard, a sketching pencil and 20 minutes to draw what we could see. We used lots of direction and position words like in front of, next to, behind, to the right of, to the left of and close to, to describe where things were before starting our sketches.

WANTED

Have you seen this girl?

Crime Scene Investigation

 

Something dreadful has happened! Over the weekend, a thief sneaked into school and pinched all of our traditional tale storybooks from the music room! We arrived in school to find the music room cordoned off with police crime-scene tape. We have no idea who the perpetrator is, but police have discovered a number of clues left behind by the suspect. We were allowed entry to the crime scene to examine and photograph the evidence. We explored the crime scene, looked carefully at each clue and tried to guess the identity of the perpetrator.

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Wanted Posters

Police discovered CCTV  footage of the crime which shows a very suspicious character entering the music room and reading our books before making off with them in a big red box.  Luckily the suspect's face and body was captured in the footage.  We looked closely at her appearance and created a gallery of wanted posters to display around school to encourage everyone to keep a lookout for our thief.  Do you recognise the suspect?

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Summer 1 - History Topic

Move It! 

Exploring transport through time.

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Entry Point - What was it like?

 

As young historians, we are exploring transport through time.  We looked at old photographs from Tullie House Museum of different modes of transport from the past including Penny Farthing bicycles, steam powered boats and trains, horse-drawn buses and carriages, airships and wooden bi-planes.  We tried to imagine what it might have been like to travel in these.   Were they safe? How comfortable were they? How fast did they go? How far did they go? How many people did they carry? What fuel did they use? 

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Introducing the Yewdale Wacky Races

 

We know that the transport that we travel in today looks very different from transport in the past. To help us to think about transport design, children were challenged to a race! Not just any race, but a wacky race! Children were given an hour to design and build a prototype of a new mode of transport.
Our young designers were given 3 design criteria that they had to follow: 1) their vehicle prototypes had to be constructed using cardboard, parcel tape and felt-tip pens, 2) the vehicle had to be big enough to carry all members of the team, and 3) each prototype had to have a name and a racing number.

Once completed, our prototypes were taken for a practise lap around the playground and any last minute design adjustments made. Teams then assembled at the start line and waited for the countdown.

Teams raced up and down the playground in Yewdale’s very own Wacky Race!

3..2..1..and they're off!

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Science Investigation – Our amazing senses!

 

We know that we use all of our senses all of the time to help us make sense of the world around us. To test how good our senses are, we were given a series of smell, taste and touch blindfold challenges to complete. On the taste challenge station, we were given pots of mystery foods to taste. had to use our sense of taste to describe, and try to identify each mystery sample. To make the challenge harder we had to close our eyes so that we couldn’t see the food we were tasting. On the smelling challenge station, an array of mystery liquids were poured into cups for us to smell, describe and try to identify. Finally, on the touch challenge station, a number of mystery everyday objects were hidden in feely bags for us to feel, describe and identify.

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Meet Lydia and her Guide Dog Bertie

In Science, we have been learning about our senses; sight, hearing, smell, taste and touch.  We were delighted to welcome two very special visitors to Blyton;  Lydia and her guide dog Bertie.  Lydia and Bertie have been together for 14 months.  Lydia is partially sighted, and she explained how Bertie helps her at home, at work, and when they are out and about together.  Bertie began his guide dog training when he was 10 weeks old.  He is now 3 years old, and is still in training.  Lydia answered lots of our questions.   

Science Investigation - our amazing senses

We know that we use all of our senses, all of the time to help us make sense of the world around us. To test how good our senses are, we were given a series of smell, taste and touch challenges to complete. On the 'taste' challenge station, we were given pots of mystery foods to taste. We had to use our sense of taste to describe, and try to identify each mystery sample. To make the challenge harder we had to close our eyes so that we couldn’t see the food we were tasting. On the 'smell' challenge station, an array of mystery liquids were poured into cups for us to smell, describe and try to identify. Finally, on the 'touch' challenge station, a number of mystery everyday objects were hidden in sealed feely bags for us to feel, describe and identify.

Using our amazing sense of smell, touch and taste to complete a challenge...

Royal Wedding Afternoon Tea

 

To celebrate the Royal Wedding, we hosted an afternoon tea for our friends and families. We wrote and sent invitations, decorated our school playgrounds with our homemade red, white and blue themed bunting, and made delicious chocolate marshmallow nibbles for the whole school to enjoy.

Preparing for our Royal Wedding street party...

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Maths? No problem!

 
Children were given two mastery challenges to solve to deepen their understanding of place value, numbers and the number system. In their first mastery challenge, children had to work in teams to solve the missing number doubling and halving problems using large sheets of sugar paper and counters. In their second challenge, children created rules for odd and even numbers, and used these to identify, sort and represent odd and even numbers using concrete equipment.

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The very loud alarm clock!

Have you ever been woken up by a loud noise? Poor Bony Tony bought a new alarm clock to wake him up for school, but the ringing of the alarm is far too loud and wakes him up with a fright every morning. Bony Tony challenged us to plan and carry out a fair test to identify the best material to use to make an alarm clock blanket to absorb some of the sound from his alarm.

 

We were given five materials to test; newspaper, cotton fabric, tin foil, bubble-wrap plastic and cotton wool wadding.  We planned our investigation using our fair test planner.  We decided to wrap the ringing alarm clock in one fold of each material.  We placed the alarm clock on a chalk X, and then moved away from the alarm metre by metre, keeping count, until we could no longer hear the alarm ringing. We compared and handled each test material, and used our observations to make a simple prediction about the material we thought would absorb the most sound.  We created a simple table to record our results.  We tested each material and discovered that the most sound absorbant material was the wool wadding.  We discussed the physical properties of the wadding to suggest reasons why this material might have worked best. 

Testing the materials...

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P4C - Philosophy for five and six year olds!

Children in year one were asked to put on their thinking caps, in the first of a series of planned philosophy lessons. Children were given a crown and asked to try it on. They were asked: Does the crown make you a king or a queen? After much discussion, they were then given a name label belonging to another child in class and asked: Does wearing that name label now make you that person?  Encouraging our young learners to philosophize like this helps them to gain the confidence to ask questions and learn through discussion.

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Lights! Camera! Action! Year One Animation Workshop

In computing this half-term, we will be planning and creating our own simple stop-frame animations using Lego Movie Maker on our school iPads.  In our first session, we practised creating movement by taking sequences of photographs using simple toys. 

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Creating a new character for a Funny Bones setting

We are reading the story of Funny Bones by Allan and Janet Ahlberg.  We had a go at creating a new setting for Big Skeleton, Little Skeleton and Dog Skeleton to explore.  Our new settings include an erutping volcano, a busy restaurant, an adventure play ground, a towering waterfall and the world's tallest rollercoaster.     Mrs Roberts then challenged us to create a new character, linked to our setting. We shared our ideas as to what our new character might look like and what they might do. We used the desktop paint tools in j2e, on our school laptops, to create our character. We printed our characters out and showcased them at the end of our lesson. 

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Martin the Maths Monster's Tricky Challenge

 

We have been learning to represent 2-digit numbers using counting objects.   Martin our maths monster set us a tricky partitioning challenge – to make a given 2-digit number using dienes rods and cubes to show how many groups of ten and how many ones. We worked in small teams to complete the challenge, and then checked each other's answers.

How many tens and ones?

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Oil Pastel Self-Portraits

 

Mrs Wise gave us a tricky art challenge: to draw a self-portrait using sketching pencils and oil pastel crayons. To complete this challenge, we used mirrors to look closely at our faces, and we noticed all of the little features that are unique to us; the colour and shape of our eyes, the length and shape of our nose, the colour and texture of our hair and tone and shadows of our skin. We sketched and coloured our portraits on a small canvas square.  Our portraits will be proudly displayed in our school reception to welcome visitors to our school.

Self-Portrait Gallery

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Ordering days of the week and months of the year.

 

In maths, we are exploring time. We know that we can measure the passing of time using small interval measures like seconds and minutes and larger interval measures like days and months. We know that there are seven days in a week and twelve months in a year, and we have been practising putting these into order and using them to solve the passing of time problems.

Time detectives!

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Sport Relief Challenge 2018

 

This year, as part of the Sport Relief 'Move a Mile' Challenge, we used hula hoops to form a giant walking crocodile.  We then marched four times around the perimeter of our school playing fields, a distance equivalent to a mile.  We sang songs and helped each other to make sure we all completed the challenge together.   

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Spring 2 - Geography Unit

Hip Hip Hooray!  We're going on holiday!

 
   

 

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Science

Working Scientifically: Classifying and sorting animals

 

This half term, we have been exploring animals; we have been identifying and naming a variety of common animals including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals and identifying and grouping common animals as carnivores, herbivores and omnivores.

We worked scientifically by comparing, contrasting, grouping and sorting familiar animals, describing and explaining how we have grouped them. In art, we used charcoals and pastels to draw diagrams showing the parts of different animals including mammals, fish, birds, reptiles and amphibians. We looked closely at the natural world around us, and used secondary sources of information (information books and the internet) to notice patterns in nature, and to ask and answer simple questions to help us discover more about each group of animals. We made an animal flip book to show you how much we have learnt!

Animal Classification Flip books

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Chalk Pastel Animal Art

We know that we can group animals as birds, mammals, fish, reptiles and amphibians.  We were asked to pick one of the fascinating animals that we have been exploring in science and use the iPads to search for images of this creature.  We looked closely at the colour, shape and features of our chosen animal, and then lightly sketched it using artist's pencils and the drawing skills we have been learning.  We then added colour and texture using chalk pastels.  

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Desktop Master Painters

In computing this half term, we are learning how to use desktop paint tools to edit images and create our own digital pictures.  Using j2e on our school iPads, we have been experimenting with brush and colour effects, importing backgrounds, objects and shapes to design and 'paint' our own pictures. 

Understanding division as grouping and sharing

In maths, our young mathematicians were introduced division.  We know that ÷ is the same as grouping and sharing, and that the answer in a ÷ calculation is always smaller.   We used paper plates and concrete equipment to represent and solve simple division problems, making sure that we always shared the objects equally. We then had a go at drawing our own division arrays. 

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Guess Who? Celebrating World Book Day 2018

 

In celebration of World Book Day, we came to school dressed as a character from our favourite book. It was wonderful to see our classroom filled with lots of familiar characters from the stories we enjoy reading together. We took photographs of ourselves dressed up, and used these pictures to help us write a description about our chosen characters.

Can you guess our book characters?

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Watch Out!

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Watch out - Burglar Bill's about!

Burglar Bill, the character from Janet and Allan Ahlberg's much-loved picture book, sneaked into our classroom to help us celebrate World Book Day.  It was a disaster!  Burglar Bill spent the morning pinching letters and numbers from around our classroom.  In maths, he stole all of the numbers from our multiplication posters, and so we had to work together to put them back again.  In phonics, he took some of the letters from our red tricky words, and we had to put them back again.  Enough was enough!  The police arrived but Burglar Bill was nowhere to be seen - he had crept away and was hiding somewhere in school.  The police asked us to help them find Bill by creating some wanted posters and displaying them around school.  Have you seen Bill?   

Read our wanted posters to find out about Burglar Bill.

Replacing the missing numbers in maths...

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Launching our topic

Welcome to Yewdale Travel

 

We opened the doors to our new travel agency and welcomed in some very excited customers.    Children worked in small teams to look through a range of travel brochures showing travel destinations from around the world, to compare and contrast the different holidays on offer, and find an exotic holiday destinations that they would like to travel to.  They had to think about the things that they would do at their destination, the things they would need to pack for their holiday, how long they would like to stay and how they might travel there. 

 

Children  shared their chosen destinations, using our globe to find the location of each destination in the world. 

 

Where in the world would we like to go?

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English - Exploring Instructions

How to Wash a Woolly Mammoth

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A mysterious parcel arrived in class. We carefully opened it and discovered a very smelly woolly mammoth, a bath, a sponge, a bottle of shampoo, a towel and a letter asking for our help. We used the objects from the parcel, and the clues in the letter to decide how to help.  We would wash the woolly mammoth.  But...how on earth do you wash a woolly mammoth?  Luckily, Mrs Roberts remembered washing a woolly mammoth many, many years ago and told us how.  We listened to these step by step instructions, adding actions to help us remember the order.   We then worked together to create a text story map for our classroom washing line.

Our Class Story Map - How to wash a woolly mammoth!

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Creating our own Story Text Maps

Having learnt the step by step instructions using our shared storymap, Mrs Roberts challenged us to work in small groups and draw our own storymaps to help us think about the structure of the story, and memorise the step by step instructions.  We even created some of our own symbols and pictures for the storytelling actions we had learnt. 

Our Story Maps ...

Geography - Where in the world?

 

We have been learning to locate our favourote holiday destinations on a world map.  We already know a lot about holidays, and we have been exploring some exotic holiday destinations. We looked closely at a world globe and noticed the oceans, seas and continent land masses that make up the surface of our planet. We had a go at matching the names of continents and oceans using simple maps and magnifying glasses. We then worked in teams to find our favourite holiday destinations. We wrote a map label to explain where our destination was, the county it is in and the continent it is on. We also explained how we travelled there, and added these labels to our class map.

Look at all of the places in the world we have visited!

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Drawing with charcoal

Our young artists are learning to use a variety of media to create pieces of art, and this half-term we are exploring charcoals. 

We practised using charcoals in different ways to make faint, soft lines, stronger lines by applying pressure, and then larger sweeping lines.  We looked at some black and white sketches of animals from around the world.  Children were given a blank cartridge and charcoals, and challenged to create their own charcoal animal sketch.  What animals can you see in our gallery? 

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Spring 1 - History Unit

3..2..1..Blast Off!  A Timeline of Space Exploration

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Welcome to Yewdale's School for Astronauts 

Children in Year One were welcomed into Yewdale's new astronaut training school where they were given a series of 'astronaut' challenges to complete.  Each challenge was designed to test their thinking and problem solving skills, powers of determination, team work, creativity and imagination.   Our budding astronauts collected golden stars for each challenge they successfully completed.  Children were awarded their astronaut 'stripes' at the end of our challenge. 

Watch our Astronaut Video. Astronauts - Have you got what it takes?

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Astronaut Class of 2018 - Our future space explorers

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Astronaut Training

 

Task 1: To know what a rocket launch is like

We watched a video about a rocket blasting off into space. We then held our own launch in our classroom, thinking about how it might feel to be in a real rocket.  It was quite scary, noisy and definitely wobbly! We had to sit upside down!

The launch...

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Task 2 - Describing our journey into space

After we participated in our own rocket launch, we talked about how we felt during the launch, what we liked and didn’t like. We all agreed it would be loud and bumpy, and probably a little bit scary in the cockpit of the shuttle. We had a go at writing our ideas down, and then we shared them with each other.

Blasting into space was....

Task 3 - Packing an astronaut's suitcase for a visit to the International Space Station.

Before we launched into space, we wrote a list of 10 things that we wanted to pack ready for an adventure on the International Space Station.  Some of us wanted things that we would miss from home, such as a special teddy bear, a favourite book or game and delicious snacks and drinks.  Some of us wanted to take useful things such as tools so that we could fix things if they went wrong! What would you take to space?

What does an astronaut take to space?

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Task 4 - Astronaut Food Tasting

What on earth do astronauts eat?  We tried astronaut food as part of our entry point learning. The food came in small packets, but there was enough for all of us to try all three types of ice cream. It was freeze dried, which means the water has been taken out. We could crumble it and squash it, not like normal ice cream at all. However, when we tasted it, we found out that it was just like the real flavour! It was a bit odd though.

What on earth do astronauts eat?

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Task 6 - Rocket Engineers
Mrs Robert’s challenged us to build a rocket that could fly to the moon using a plastic bottle, a plastic cup, strips of cardboard, glue and sticky tape. We looked at images of space rockets on the internet for design ideas. We had to think about the shape of the body of our rocket and the nose. We constructed the nose cone using rolled cardboard, which was very tricky! We decorated our rockets using collage materials, glue and sticky tape. We then launched our rockets using lines of string, straws and balloons for propulsion, and measured how far they travelled in non-metric alien footprints.

Building our prototypes...

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Our design teams...

Task 7 - Moon Walk Adventure

We donned our space suits and breathing apparatus and we went on a moon walk. To help us imagine what an astronaut’s moon boot might be like, we put on one of Mrs Lloyd’s BIG wellies and made a footprint in some sand. Our footprints looked just like they would if we had actually stepped foot on the surface of the moon. We imagined what it might feel like wearing a suit that weighs 300lb.

Moon walking ...

Task 8 - Rocket Fuel Problem Solving

To use non-standard units to measure and compare the volume of rocket fuel in different sized containers.

Our Investigation: To discover which bottle contains the largest volume of rocket fuel.

The Problem: We are preparing our rocket for launch and we need to make sure we have enough rocket fuel on board for our trip. We have been given lots of different containers of fuel but there is only room on the rocket for one bottle.  We need to take the container that contains the greatest volume.  Can identify the container we must take?

 

Solving a capacity measurement problem using non-standard cups

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Writing a non-chronological report

We have been learning how to write a non-chronological report. We know that a good report must have a title (that tells the reader what a report is about), sub-headings (to organise our information), paragraphs of facts (to tell the reader more), and an interesting ‘Did You Know’ fact (to amaze the reader).  We read some simple non-chronological reports about the planets in our Solar System, and then we worked in writing team to write our own report about The Moon, Neptune and Pluto.  Here are the interesting introductions we wrote.    

 

 

Introducing Pluto, The Moon and Neptune...

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Writing our own non-chronological reports to introduce some exciting, newly discovered planets in a galaxy far, far away ...

 

We used craft materials to design and build a model of a fantastic new planet for a distant galaxy, and then had a go at writing a non-chronological report about it. We named our planets, described their appearance, imagined what you might see or do if you visited it, and then dreamed up an exciting and interesting fact about it. We used our writer’s toolkit to help us write our reports.

Which planet would you like to visit?

Creating planets for a galaxy far, far away...

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Yewdale Astronauts! We need your help!

NASA Challenge

Nrich Measurement Investigation 1                 

 

3..2..1..Blast Off! How far will my rocket fly?

Focus: To measure and begin to record length using non-standard units of measurement.

We received a letter from NASA asking for our help. They want to explore all of planets in our solar system, but their space shuttles are too old, and they worry that they won’t be able to fly far enough into space anymore. They need to find some new rockets quickly! NASA know that, as part of our training, we designed some exciting new rocket prototypes. NASA challenged us to test our rockets to measure how far they can fly. They sent us some measuring objects to help us carry out our investigation. We had to work together, measure each length accurately, record our results to send them to NASA as soon as possible.

Measuring length using non-standard units

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Nrich Measurement Investigation 2:

3..2..1..Blast Off! How far will my rocket fly?

LS: To measure, record and compare length using a non-standard unit of measurement.

At the end of our first investigation we discovered a problem! We had all measured the distance our rockets had flown using different measuring objects like spiders, cones, dinner bands and hoops and so we couldn’t compare our results to see which rocket had actually flown the furthest. We thought about how we could solve the problem, and decided that we all should use the same measuring objects. We agreed to the paperclip rulers we made yesterday. We repeated our rocket launch investigation, recorded and compared our results and then sent them to NASA.

 

Using an appropriate unit of measure to solve a problem...

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Bean Seed Investigation

LS: To describe how to plant a seed.

LS: To observe what happens when a seed does not have sunlight, water or soil.

We are exploring seeds and plants in Science. To launch our investigation, we were given some bean seeds to grow. We shared our ideas about the equipment we would need and how we might plant our seeds. We know that seeds need the nutrients from soil, water and sunlight to grow. We collected the equipment we needed to plant our seeds and then created our own set of step by step instructions to help us to plant our seeds. We watered our planted seeds and placed our pots next to the windows at the back of our classroom.

We then planted 3 test seeds. One seed will not be given any water, another seed was planted on a paper towel instead of soil, and a third was planted and placed in a dark cupboard. We will observe and compare how these seeds grow with the seeds in our classroom.

Our young plant scientists...

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Maths - To read, write and represent numbers to 20.

 

We know that numbers can be represented using numerals, words, number lines, concrete equipment, coins and pictorial representations. In pairs, we picked a number to 20, and we tried to represent it as many different ways as we could.  We challenged other teams to try and guess our number.

Representing numbers in different ways...

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 Fabric Sapce Art

 

This half-term in design technology, children were challenged to plan and make a space picture using different swatches of fabric.  We searched for space scenes on the iPads, and used the ideas we collected to sketch and colour a  design plan.  We then collected the materials we wanted to use to create our fabric picture.  We experiemented with joining the pieces of fabrics together in different ways using a simple running stitch, glue, safety pins and staples. 

 

We think our finished pictures are out of this world! 

 

Constructing our fabric space art...

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Our fabric art is out of this world!

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Autumn 2 - Geography Unit

Exploring Carlisle

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Our World - Discovering Carlisle

This half term,  our young geographers will explore their local environment, and know that Yewdale is part of the city of Carlisle. They will use aerial and street maps to locate our school and their homes on the map. They will begin to notice map symbols, simple compass points and use directional language to read the maps and follow the routes. They will look at man-made (houses, roads, pathways and railways) features depicted on the map and those that are natural (woods, parkland, lakes and rivers).  Children will then create their own map of their local area using pictures and symbols. 

Launching our new topic - Discovering Carlisle

 

We launched our new topic in deepest darkest space with a challenge - can we spot Carlisle from space?  We used an inflatable globe to find the United Kingdon and England.  We noticed how big our world is and how small our country is.  We looked at the shape of our country on the globe, and how it is surrounded by sea.  We then used google maps of planet Earth to try and spot The United Kingdom.  We zoomed from space into the northern hemisphere, and from there we zoomed into the United Kingdom, and then into Cumbria and Carlisle.  

Knowledge Harvest 

To find out what we already know about Carlisle, Mrs Roberts challenged us to work together to draw or write down eveything we know about our city.  We know that we have a castle, a cathedral and a museum in the middle of our city, a railway station, swimming pool and lots of shops and restaurants like The Entertainer Toy Shop and McDonalds.  Between us we could name lots of places where we like to go with our friends and family.  

Mrs Roberts then asked us to write down all of the questions we had about our city and some of the buildings we see everyday.  We added our questions to our question wall so that we can answer them as we learn all about our local area.  

Here are some of our questions: Who lives in the castle?  How old is the castle?  What is the river called?  How many people live in our city?  Where do all of the cars go at night?  How many shops are there?  Why is there a big park in the middle of the city?    

Launching our topic.

Mapping Yewdale

In Blyton this week, we have been comparing aerial maps and street maps of Yewdale, our local area.  We talked about the human and physical features we could identify on each map and how they looked different from one another.  We then stepped into the map using google street view, and walked up and down the streets around our school.  We passed some of our homes, our local shop, church and community centre.   We realised that there are a lot of buildings, parks and gardens where we live and that it could be easy to get lost without a map to follow.   Using the aerial and street maps, we imagined our route home from school, and had a go at drawing our own street map of Yewdale.  Do you recognise some of the features on our maps? 

Drawing our own maps of Yewdale.

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Christmas workshop - designing and building a snowman decoration

 

It's that time of year again when we get ready to decorate our school christmas tree.  We surfed the internet to look at different decoration ideas, and we decided to transform our recyclable milk bottle cartons into cheery snowman decorations.  We washed out our milk cartons, covered them in PVA glue and cotton wool, added carrot-nosed faces and made and decorated our own winter pom pom hats.  Mrs Roberts helped us to assemble our decorations using a hot glue gun.  Our snowmen will look amazing on our school tree.       

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Investigating Seasonal Changes

In science, we have been exploring seasonal change, and we know that the weather changes with each season of the year.  We used the interent to search for images of spring, summer, autumn and winter and compared the pictures we found.  We talked about the changes we could see in each season including the weather, plants, trees and animals and length of daylight.  We used our understanding of seasons to make our own seasonal calendars.   

What features are the same? What are different?

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Wishing you a very Merry Christmas! 

This year, we used finger paints to design and paint our class christmas cards.  We shared and combined our design ideas to create a master template, which we then copied to create our individual cards.  We used our hands and fingers to paint a background winter scene and then we added some robins.  We watched the robins through our classroom window feeding in our playground and noticed the colour markings on their head, wings and body.      

Wishing you a Merry Little Robin Christmas...

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Christingle

Once again, we took part in a christingle workshop to help us understand the importance of Jesus and the Gospel, and its relevance at Christmas time.   We made our Christingle candles, and used them in a special Christingle thanksgiving service.  We know that the orange represents the world, the red tape symbolises the love and blood of Christ, the sweets and dried fruit represent all of God’s creations and the lit candle represents Jesus’s light in the world, bringing hope to people living in darkness. 

Making our Christingle Candles

Autumn 2 Book Study - Stick Man by Julia Donaldson

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Introducing our new class story - Stick Man by Julia Donaldson 

A mystery bag, addressed to children in Year 1, was delivered to our classroom.  The bag contained  a stick and a set of clues about our new story.  We used the clues to try and guess what our new story might be.   We guessed Stick Man, and when we unwrapped the story, we found a letter from Stick Man asking for our help.  He is desperate for a new adventure and wondered if we would be able to write him a new one.  First however, he challenged us to find out more about him and his previous adventures, so we read the story and looked at the sequence of events.  We then had a go at retelling the story using a Talk For Writing storymap.

 

Drawing a story map of Stick Man

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A letter from Stick Man

What does Stick Man look like? 

We are worried that not many people in Yewdale School know about Stick Man, and so we decided to write a character profile for him so that people visiting our classroom will be able to find out all about him.   We looked at the illustrations of Stick Man from the story and used these to describe his appearance.  We mind mapped all of the parts of Stick Man's body that we could describe and then created an adjective word bank of interesting words we could use in our writing.   Did you know that Stick Man's body is rough, brown and bumpy and his arms are long, smooth and bendy?  Read all of our descriptions below:

Our super descriptions of Stick Man's appearance.

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Creating an underwater character for a new

Stick Man adventure

 

We are writing a new adventure for Stick Man.  We decided that his next adventure will take place under the sea.  We illustrated an under water setting with a sandy sea bed, sharp underwater rocks and floating seaweed.   We then filled our setting with a colourful crabs, a sneaky shark, a shimmery starfish and lots of stripy fish.  We looked at Stick Man's previous adventures and decided that we needed to introduce a brand new character to add excitement to our story.  Using large sheets of paper, felt pens and our boundless imagination, we worked in pairs to draw a new underwater creature.   All of our creatures were colourful, unusual and unique.  We hope you enjoy looking at Snappy, ScubaDiva, Scarly, Rainbow, Lines, Snapper, Smilee and Flubber.   

Creature Gallery

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Exploring tints and shade

We have been using primary colours to create our own tints and shades.  We know that a tint is made when we add white paint to a colour, and that that more white we add, the lighter the tint we create.  We know that a shade is made when we mix black into a colour, and the more black we add, the darker the shade we create.  We used our tint palettes to paint a yewdale streetscape, and our shade palettes to paint key Carlisle landmarks, including Carlisle Castle, Carlisle Cathedral, the railway station, Tullie House Museum and Dixons Chimney.  We hope you enjoy our painting.  Can you identify the landmarks we painted? 

Using tints to create a Yewdale Streetscape...

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Using shade to paint Carlisle landmarks...

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